Day By Day© by Chris Muir.

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Monday, July 23, 2012

Another Appleseed

I did another Appleseed this weekend.  This time I got a .22 rifle of my own, tried to do it over the stock iron sights, and although my aim standing was good, my aim prone and sitting flat out sucked.  It's mostly sight picture, I think.  My equipment seems OK, and the things I do as far as where my legs and arms are, relaxing, breathing right, not dragging wood, etc. looked good.  I think I'm going to go get a cheapie scope when I get paid.  Or Tech sights.  I haven't decided. The groups I got when I borrowed someone's rifle with tech sights were a lot tighter, and closer to the part of the target I was aiming at.  But my vision's not getting any younger, so I'll probably go for the scope.

Even though my marksmanship sucked this weekend, I'm signing up to be an instructor in training, because I think it's important that everyone learn to shoot.  It's one of those skills that every adult should have, along with driving a car, balancing a checkbook, etc.  Not just a skill - a civic duty.  And now I'm in for at least a hundred or maybe a couple hundred hours of training, and a lot of volunteer work.  And I got this neon orange hat to wear while doing it!  Ooh, swag.

Humorously, when I got home last night and was cleaning my rifle, I did something stupid and a couple parts went SPROING, and although I eventually got it all put back together, all I had to go on was an exploded view that didn't show really exactly where the parts went.  Now I know more about the trigger group than I ever thought I'd have to know.  Hey, at least I found that spring...

Also, the first time I used my .22 bore snake, I had to brace the (disassembled) barrel with my feet and pull that snake as hard as I possibly could.  That would make a funny TV sitcom scene.  I was convinced I was going to rip that snake in half and it would be stuck in the barrel.  But it finally got through.

I may be a noob and a comedy of errors now, but as they say, a Rifleman persists...

Oh, by the way, a teenage boy made Rifleman on Sunday.  He was using Tech sights. His groups were really tight.  And we also got to shoot an M-1 at the end of the day.  That thing had so much kick to it, I felt like it had slapped me upside the head and punched me in the shoulder at the same time. It was pretty heavy.  I can't imagine how soldiers could stand lugging that thing through the jungle for months on end, plus all the ammo and other stuff.  On the bright side, they field-strip without tools.  That's pretty cool.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

It was good to see you out there! And I suspect, since so many brought their children, you may have had others with you. Now that you have waded further into the program, you can bring even more!

Thank you for taking on the "Orange Hat", it is a rewarding endeavor. The passing on of the Heritage is critical to preserving our country, as our Founders passed it on to us.

Look forward to seeing out there again!

ff

Edheler said...

Your hammer spring went flying? I sure hope it wasn't the other spring. :)

Here is a great guide for disassembling and reassembling the Ruger 10/22 trigger group: http://brasstard.com/2010/03/26/ruger-1022-fire-control-group-assembly/

Penny Pincher Personal Finance said...

Yeah, it was the hammer spring, with that little paddle inside it. Really no biggie. And then there was this flippy thing that goes in a slot, that ended up on the wrong side of the hammer somehow. And then because I also did something dumb with the bolt (forgot to close it before removing the trigger group, so it snapped shut on me), the bolt lock piece was sticking up so I couldn't get the trigger group back in, which is what caused me to start fiddling with it in the first place. Yeah, I'm a noob. Thanks for the guide, I'll download and save it to my hard drive.

To Anon: I didn't have anyone with me, I wish I had, but I'm working on getting others to go with me for next time.

This IIT is just what I needed to channel my urgent sense of "The regulars are out, something must be done" into something positive.